Castration day on the farm

I'm sure the bulls were loathing this annual occasion. At least that's what I thought their breathy "moos" and snorts conveyed.

An assignment was given to me to photograph images related to farm injury. So I met Mr. Alquin Heinnickel, who has been raising cattle for 45 years, at his Hempfield farm. Uneasy around the camera, he quickly showed me his combine, silo unloader and grain dryer. Luckily I asked assertively if I could photograph him actually working instead of a 10 minute tour. 

Though these images are somewhat unrelated to the original assignment, I thought it was a fun opportunity to be in a farmer's shoes for a day. 

With the snow, mud, uncooperative cattle and long hours, my current high respect for farmers increased immensely. Our country is so fortunate to have these men and women in our communities.

 

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, pauses while working on his farm on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, pauses while working on his farm on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, stands near his combine while working on his farm on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, stands near his combine while working on his farm on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, pauses while working on his farm on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, pauses while working on his farm on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel III, a veterinarian and the son of Hempfield farmer Alquin Heinnickel who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, castrates a bull in a cattle chute on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel III, a veterinarian and the son of Hempfield farmer Alquin Heinnickel who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, castrates a bull in a cattle chute on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Dean Reed (left) and Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, tag and vaccinate a cow on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Dean Reed (left) and Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, tag and vaccinate a cow on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, pauses while working with a cattle chute on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Alquin Heinnickel, a Hempfield farmer who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, pauses while working with a cattle chute on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Dean Reed, a worker with Hempfield farmer Alquin Heinnickel, who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, tends to a slow moving steer after he was castrated on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”

Dean Reed, a worker with Hempfield farmer Alquin Heinnickel, who has been raising cattle for about 45 years, tends to a slow moving steer after he was castrated on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Heinnickel said the federal data may be undercounting the number of farm injuries because often times farmers are injured on the job but “you don’t hear much about it.”